Space news: 'Dark matter' may not exist after all, new research suggests

The Hubble Space Telescope captured this image of NGC 5949 some 44 million light years away.

For many years, astronomers, physicists and cosmologists have theorised that the universe is stuffed with an unique materials referred to as “darkish matter” that explains the stranger gravitational behaviour of galaxies and galaxy clusters.

Darkish matter, in response to mathematical fashions, makes up three-quarters of all of the matter within the universe.

However it’s by no means been seen or absolutely defined.

And whereas darkish matter has turn into the prevailing idea to elucidate one of many larger mysteries of the universe, some scientists have seemed for various explanations for why galaxies act the best way they do.

Now, a world workforce of scientists says it has discovered new proof that maybe darkish matter doesn’t actually exist after all.

In research published in November in the Astrophysical Journal, the scientists report tiny discrepancies within the orbital speeds of distant stars that they assume reveals a faint gravitational impact – and one that would put an finish to the prevailing concepts of darkish matter.

The research suggests an incomplete scientific understanding of gravity is behind what seems to be the gravitational power of galaxies and galaxy clusters, somewhat than huge clouds of darkish matter.

The Hubble Space Telescope captured this image of NGC 5949 some 44 million light years away.
The Hubble Space Telescope captured this picture of NGC 5949 some 44 million gentle years away. Credit score: CNN/NASA