Mother has been hiding in a church for three years after asylum claim rejected in the US

On the morning of President Joe Biden’s inauguration, Vicky Chavez mentioned she jolted away from bed and turned on the tv in the upstairs room of the Unitarian church she calls residence.

“Look, we’ve lastly bought a (new) president now,” the Honduran mom of two mentioned, squeezing her three-year-old daughter as they watched Biden put his hand on the Bible and take the oath of workplace.

“Does this imply we will go to Disneyland?” her daughter requested, hopefully.

“Not but,” Chavez mentioned, stroking her hair and holding her shut. “However hopefully quickly.”

Over the previous three years, Chavez hasn’t been in a position to take her daughters to Disneyland – or anyplace else, for that matter – as a result of they’ve been dwelling in the confines of the First Unitarian Church in Salt Lake Metropolis.

When she lost her final attraction to remain in the nation, after an immigration choose rejected her asylum claim and US Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) issued her a deportation order, the church provided her a short-term haven.

All Chavez needed to do was present up, and he or she and her daughters may keep for so long as they wanted.

On the morning of President Joe Biden’s inauguration, Vicky Chavez said she jolted out of bed and turned on the television in the upstairs room of the Unitarian church she calls home.
On the morning of President Joe Biden’s inauguration, Vicky Chavez mentioned she jolted away from bed and turned on the tv in the upstairs room of the Unitarian church she calls residence. Credit score: SUPPLIED